The Makings of a Good Redemption Arc (a discussion of The Tiger at Midnight by Swati Teerdhala)

Hey there guys, gals, and non-binary pals! Today, I want to tell you all about another book that I bought months ago and only recently finished (because I am trash like that). I posted one of my usual ‘pick my next read from my physical TBR’ polls on Twitter (which I started doing in an attempt to knock some items off of the catastrophically large pile of books I haven’t read yet) and the book that won that particular poll was The Tiger at Midnight, by Swati Teerdhala.

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Get this book here!

One aspect of this book immediately caught my attention, and that’s the redemption arc one of the main characters undergoes. It got me thinking about redemption arcs in general, and how authors sometimes don’t really get to pull it off well because they fundamentally misunderstand their own characters (I’m looking at you, J.K. Rowling).

What really struck me about The Tiger at Midnight and its featured redemption arc is how well it was done. Redemption arcs – especially those that feature the character being redeemed falling in love with a hero – can often be fraught with toxic pitfalls, but this book avoided them neatly and nicely. And in this blog entry, I break down what was it about this redemption arc that made it work!

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When Do Slow-Paced Books Work? (a discussion of Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson)

It was too slow-paced. I was bored. I kept flipping pages to get to the end. These phrases are just some of the common criticisms we hear often regarding books that are either slow-paced or have a stretched out plot. Sometimes, those criticisms are valid. After all, I’ve done my fair share of flipping through books that I felt were taking for-fucking-ever to get to the point like Wicked Saints.

However, I’d like to present my hot take for the day: a slow pace can be fit a book better than a fast one, and it totally depends on the author’s ultimate goals for their audience’s reading experience.

A perfect example is the book I recently finished, Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson. At first, I was pretty reluctant to pick up the book because I’d been seeing mixed reviews of it online, but I decided to one day (the day me, JM, Inah, and Miel went to Pride, incidentally!) because a) that cover is gorgeous, and b) it was on sale!

After an interminably loooong time (I mean, clearly – I bought it in June and just finished reading it in November, lol) I finally picked up this book, went very quickly through it, and realized that I actually disagreed with most people’s assessment that the book was boring!

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Purchase this book here.

Your mileage may vary, of course. Not everyone’s going to have the same opinion about a book. But I do think that, in general, we’ve been spoiled by fast-paced, action-packed YA books where everything moves along really quickly. Not that there’s anything wrong with that! Some of my favorite books play out like a movie on the page. But because we’re so used to things being set in motion quickly, we’ve come to expect that same treatment for almost every book we read.

I believe that the slow pace worked just fine for Sorcery of Thorns and added an aspect to the book that would not have been there had the plot gone faster.

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[Discussion Post] Jade War – Fonda Lee // fantasy in the time of globalization

Welcome to my stop on the Jade War Tour, guys, gals, and enby pals! Thank you so much to Shealea @ Shut Up, Shealea, Caffeine Book Tours, Orbit Books, and of course Fonda Lee for letting me be a part of this blog tour, and for sending over an ARC of Jade War, a pin of Empire of Sand (click the link to read my glowing review!), and a letter from the Pillar Fonda Lee herself! The personal touches were the best thing about this package in my opinion, and I can’t think Fonda enough not only for bringing the Green Bone Saga universe into being, but for also taking the time to connect with her fans!

This is probably gonna be a long ass review, so grab your drink of choice and get comfy!

I did my best to make this review as spoiler-free as possible, but of course, tread cautiously!

Let’s get started!

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Purchase Links:
Amazon
Book Depository

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Galit Na Naman Si Tita: SOBRANG KALAT

If you had told me that the month of May on bookish Twitter was going to end like this, I wouldn’t have believed you. I mean, sometimes I think the bar for authors to behave is literally on the fucking ground, but hoo boy, some of these people have got industrial shovels.

Let me preface this entry in the Galit Na Naman Si Tita series with the following premises:

  1. Unlike my previous entries where I was more disappointed or frustrated, this time, I actually am mad. I am steaming, boiling mad.
  2. ALL OF THIS COULD HAVE BEEN AVOIDED IF PEOPLE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE PRIVATE LOCKED ACCOUNTS, IT IS NOT THAT HARD.

All right, let’s get started.

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Galit Na Naman Si Tita: Reading in the Modern-Day School Curriculum

First off, I want to preface this month’s edition of Galit Na Naman Si Tita by saying I’m not actually angry. It’s more a matter of being frustrated, I think. And also a touch of not knowing what exactly to do?

Classic readers assigned for school are one of the surefire solid ways to get a kid to read. But it’s been said time and again that a ton of the classics assigned in English classes are no longer relevant to today’s youth – or worse, offensively out of touch by being racist, sexist, homophobic, ableist or otherwise prejudiced. These books cement the notion in the heads of impressionable youth that reading is either boring or unrelatable, and they carry that notion into adulthood. (Vicky has a really great post about classics, YA, and high school that I highly recommend everyone read.)

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Galit Na Naman Si Tita: On Being a Critical Reader and Book Blogger

Hello, guys, gals, and enby pals! Welcome to a new series hosted by Your Tita Kate! Ever since I started book blogging, I’ve toyed with the idea of having monthly discussion posts – mostly because there’s only so much I can say in a Twitter thread, and y’all know I have a ton to say in Twitter threads. 😅

Anyway, this series is called Galit Na Naman Si Tita, or “Auntie’s Angry Again” in English. It’s a bit of an in-joke with me and my IRL friends. If they want to get updated on Philippine current events, all they have to do is text me and ask, “Bakit ka galit na naman?” (“Why are you angry again?”) This will usually be followed by a lengthy, horrendously detailed rant on the current event topic du jour.

But worry not! Not all of these posts will be angry! The one below certainly isn’t, mostly since I don’t think it’s my place to get angry at all. Nevertheless, I think what I have to say is pretty important to bloggers, so onward we go!

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#Augvocacy2018: The Myopia of the Book Community

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As I’m sure you’ve been seeing all the #Augvocacy2018 posts from Filipino book bloggers so I won’t delve too much into that. For a quick summary, #Augvocacy2018 is a blog series started by Shealea @ That Bookshelf Bitch for her birthday. The theme of this year’s #Augvocacy2018 is fostering a culture of reading in the Philippines, so that’s what everyone’s been writing about. And today is my turn!

Ready to hear me rant and rage? Strap yourself in for the ride!

Continue reading “#Augvocacy2018: The Myopia of the Book Community”