My Fave Books by Muslim Authors + Muslim Bloggers to Support this Ramadan

Hello friends! Welcome back to my blog. Today, I’m bringing to you a post hyping up some of my most favorite books written by Muslim authors and some of my favorite Muslim bookish content creators that you really need to check out this Ramadan – and for the rest of the year as well.

The content creators I talk about write some of the best reviews, take amazing Instagram photos, or have the best hot takes on Twitter ever. Their content was what originally got me following them, but through interacting, I discovered that they’re also some of the nicest, smartest, funniest people ever, and now I’m very proud to say that I count them my friends!

Meanwhile, these books are some of the most lush, vivid stories I’ve ever read, with important lessons to part and ideas to share. They’re a peek into various worlds and cultures that I am absolutely loving to learn about. They’ve given me pairings to root for, heroines to be obsessed with, love interests to squeal over, and the most amazing world-building. And the authors are really great people as well!

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Let’s start with my favorite Muslim bloggers!

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Fadwa 

I’ve been singing Fadwa’s praises since I started blogging – and even before I started blogging, tbh. I stumbled across her blog way back in 2017 when I myself wasn’t even a book blogger and found myself loving her recommendations and agreeing with her hot takes. I adore Fadwa’s content, implicitly trust her taste in books, and just absolutely love her!

📹 Booktube
📷 Instagram
💻 Blog
🐤 Twitter

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Ikram

I’m fairly new to being mutuals with Ikram, but she quickly won my heart because of our mutual dedication to the greatest, most nuanced YA heist book of all time – The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi. Her tweets and threads about the books she reads are hilarious, her reviews are wonderfully introspective and analytical, and I’ve gotten some really bomb book recommendations from the lists she compiles! (This post of mine was also inspired by her list of more than 15 books by Muslim authors to read this Ramadan!)

💻 Blog
🐤 Twitter

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Nadia 

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Listen, a queen who puts together a massive compendium of books by Muslim authors being released this 2020 deserves to be recognized! Not only that, Nadia is so fun to talk to and has one of the most beautifully designed and aesthetically pleasing blogs ever. That pastel colour scheme has my heart!

📷 Instagram
💻 Blog
🐤 Twitter

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Rameela 

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Have you seen her Tiktok video of her outfits matching books with great desi and Muslim representation? Because damn, girl. Her bookstagram photos are creatively flawless (and she also has a ton of more phots matching her outfits and book covers!), and her reviews are a delight to read.

📷 Instagram
💻 Blog
🐤 Twitter

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Karin

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Karin and I first became mutuals when we both discovered we were intense fans of The Poppy War and The Dragon Republic and also Altan Trengsin stans. And then she began promoting Ghost Brides by Yangsze Choo, which made me decide to read it – and I ended up loving it as well. All told, this girl has the best taste in books.

💻 Blog
🐤 Twitter

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Mina

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I first subscribed to Mina’s booktube channel because her commentary on romance novels was hilarious. I stayed subscribed and followed her on Twitter too because her recommendations are always on point. If you’re a new follower, check out her tweets where she first starts watching Avatar: the Last Airbender. She’s the best!

📹 Booktube
🐤 Twitter

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Em

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Em’s bookstagram is completely and utterly gorgeous. I’m so envious of the way she curates her feed so that her themes change but still somehow remain cohesive to a single vibe! After falling in love with her bookstagram, I followed her on Twitter and followed her blog and also discovered she writes some clever reviews as well – and is, of course, a loud voice clamoring for diversity in literature.

📷 Instagram
💻 Blog
🐤 Twitter

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Let’s talk about some of my fave books by Muslim authors!

The Candle and The Flame by Nafiza Azaad

Fatima lives in the city of Noor, a thriving stop along the Silk Road. There the music of myriad languages fills the air, and people of all faiths weave their lives together. However, the city bears scars of its recent past, when the chaotic tribe of Shayateen djinn slaughtered its entire population — except for Fatima and two other humans. Now ruled by a new maharajah, Noor is protected from the Shayateen by the Ifrit, djinn of order and reason, and by their commander, Zulfikar.

But when one of the most potent of the Ifrit dies, Fatima is changed in ways she cannot fathom, ways that scare even those who love her. Oud in hand, Fatima is drawn into the intrigues of the maharajah and his sister, the affairs of Zulfikar and the djinn, and the dangers of a magical battlefield.

Read my review here.

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The Weight of Our Sky by Hanna Alkaf

A music-loving teen with OCD does everything she can to find her way back to her mother during the historic race riots in 1969 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in this heart-pounding literary debut.

Melati Ahmad looks like your typical moviegoing, Beatles-obsessed sixteen-year-old. Unlike most other sixteen-year-olds though, Mel also believes that she harbors a djinn inside her, one who threatens her with horrific images of her mother’s death unless she adheres to an elaborate ritual of counting and tapping to keep him satisfied.

But there are things that Melati can’t protect her mother from. On the evening of May 13th, 1969, racial tensions in her home city of Kuala Lumpur boil over. The Chinese and Malays are at war, and Mel and her mother become separated by a city in flames.

With a 24-hour curfew in place and all lines of communication down, it will take the help of a Chinese boy named Vincent and all of the courage and grit in Melati’s arsenal to overcome the violence on the streets, her own prejudices, and her djinn’s surging power to make it back to the one person she can’t risk losing.

Read my review here.

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Mirage by Somaiya Daud

In a star system dominated by the brutal Vathek empire, eighteen-year-old Amani is a dreamer. She dreams of what life was like before the occupation; she dreams of writing poetry like the old-world poems she adores; she dreams of receiving a sign from Dihya that one day, she, too, will have adventure, and travel beyond her isolated moon.

But when adventure comes for Amani, it is not what she expects: she is kidnapped by the regime and taken in secret to the royal palace, where she discovers that she is nearly identical to the cruel half-Vathek Princess Maram. The princess is so hated by her conquered people that she requires a body double, someone to appear in public as Maram, ready to die in her place.

As Amani is forced into her new role, she can’t help but enjoy the palace’s beauty—and her time with the princess’ fiancé, Idris. But the glitter of the royal court belies a world of violence and fear. If Amani ever wishes to see her family again, she must play the princess to perfection…because one wrong move could lead to her death.

Read my review here.

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City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty

Nahri has never believed in magic. Certainly, she has power; on the streets of 18th century Cairo, she’s a con woman of unsurpassed talent. But she knows better than anyone that the trade she uses to get by—palm readings, zars, healings—are all tricks, sleights of hand, learned skills; a means to the delightful end of swindling Ottoman nobles.

But when Nahri accidentally summons an equally sly, darkly mysterious djinn warrior to her side during one of her cons, she’s forced to accept that the magical world she thought only existed in childhood stories is real. For the warrior tells her a new tale: across hot, windswept sands teeming with creatures of fire, and rivers where the mythical marid sleep; past ruins of once-magnificent human metropolises, and mountains where the circling hawks are not what they seem, lies Daevabad, the legendary city of brass, a city to which Nahri is irrevocably bound.

In that city, behind gilded brass walls laced with enchantments, behind the six gates of the six djinn tribes, old resentments are simmering. And when Nahri decides to enter this world, she learns that true power is fierce and brutal. That magic cannot shield her from the dangerous web of court politics. That even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences.

After all, there is a reason they say be careful what you wish for…

Join the #DiscoverDaevabad readathon for May and June! Check out the@DDaevabad Twitter account or join the Discord server to chat with like-minded Daevabad-obsessed folks!

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Plus, a bonus!

This book isn’t out yet, but it’s one of my most anticipated reads and I’m super excited for it to come out, so I couldn’t not include it!

The Henna Wars by Adiba Jaigirdar

When Nishat comes out to her parents, they say she can be anyone she wants—as long as she isn’t herself. Because Muslim girls aren’t lesbians. Nishat doesn’t want to hide who she is, but she also doesn’t want to lose her relationship with her family. And her life only gets harder once a childhood friend walks back into her life.

Flávia is beautiful and charismatic and Nishat falls for her instantly. But when a school competition invites students to create their own businesses, both Flávia and Nishat choose to do henna, even though Flávia is appropriating Nishat’s culture. Amidst sabotage and school stress, their lives get more tangled—but Nishat can’t quite get rid of her crush on Flávia, and realizes there might be more to her than she realized.

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What do you think?

☕ Who are your favorite Muslim content creators? Leave their links in the comments!
☕ What about your favorite books by Muslim authors?
☕ Have you read any of these books or follow any of these creators?

And don’t forget, if you like my content, consider buying me a coffee, donating to my PayPal, or using my Amazon affiliate links to purchase your books at no additional cost to you!

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12 thoughts on “My Fave Books by Muslim Authors + Muslim Bloggers to Support this Ramadan

  1. Pingback: Monthly wrap-up – May 2020

  2. Ahh what a wonderful post, thank you so, so much for these bloggers and book recommendations! I’m not familiar with all the bloggers or books here, but I can’t wait to check them all out ❤ The Henna Wars is also one of my most anticipated reads of the year,I can't wait to read it and fall in love with it! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Weekly Favorites: April 26th-May 2nd – Star is All Booked Up

    • Yayyy I hope you like them when you get to read them!

      OOF MIRAGE WAS SO FREAKING GOOD, IT’S SO CRIMINALLY SLEPT ON HONESTLY

      Like

  4. Pingback: Monthly Wrap || April 2020 - Hail and Well Read

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